The floating houses on the water in Cambodia

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You can visit the fishing village of Kompong Khleang to feel one side of Cambodians living with floating houses.
Khleang Kompong Siem Reap from 55 kilometers to the west, is the largest village in the most remote and mangrove lake Tonle Sap, Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO preserved. It provides more than half fish stocks throughout Cambodia.
However, life here is not easy again. Water level change gap making it dubbed the “heartbeat Cambodia”. The dry season, water flows into the Tonle Sap Mekong. The rainy season, the lake water level rise of 12 m and extends over 20,000 km2, more than 5 times in the dry season. People have to face the challenge, both physically and economically with the floating house, fragile to cope with extreme conditions.

Most of houses in this often be the fishing village is only one room bamboo hut. In the dry season, the house standing, precariously on bamboo poles firmly plugged into the reservoir. The people in the house with a long wooden ladder.

Whenever a flood, people can only use wooden boats to move around Kompong Khleang, between the sales floor, schools and health facilities, even the temple on stilts.
When the children found out sailing, they have to go to school and go home. The lake surface is their playground, jumping from boat to boat other, hide and seek on the family’s long boat.
These homes are not built on piles are designed to float on the river when the water level rise. Floating houses are often made from bamboo, wood, smaller than the floor. They are quite safe when low water tide but with strong rainy season is too precarious. Many homes have small motors, but most of them free-floating and change the sprint position.
More than 3 million people live on the lakeshore. 90% of them make a living from fishing or agriculture.

With the number of inhabitants is increasing, overfishing allowed, dam building on the Mekong serious impact on their productivity. Climate change makes the weather hot, drier after violent floods, threaten the reproduction and migration of fish species in the Tonle Sap.

Edited from BBC

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